Greenwich Reach Swing Bridge, Deptford, London. 1 of 15.

Greenwich Reach Swing Bridge, Deptford, London

Cable stayed footbridge photographed against Docklands. 2 of 15.

Cable stayed footbridge photographed against Docklands

Single mast architectural detail photography. 3 of 15.

Single mast architectural detail photography

Exterior photographer, London. 4 of 15.

Exterior photographer, London

Photograph of side profile of central cable plane. 5 of 15.

Photograph of side profile of central cable plane

External architectural handrail detail photograph. 6 of 15.

External architectural handrail detail photograph

Illuminated bridge at low tide architectural photograph. 7 of 15.

Illuminated bridge at low tide architectural photograph

Night photograph of a jogger on the bridge. 8 of 15.

Night photograph of a jogger on the bridge

Riverside Thames pathway, London. 9 of 15.

Riverside Thames pathway, London

Steel staircase to Bridge.10 of 15.

Steel staircase to Bridge

Exterior photograph of bridge at dawn. 11 of 15.

Exterior photograph of bridge at dawn

London Architectural Photographer. 12 of 15.

London Architectural Photographer

Slender architecture photographed against river. 13 of 15.

Slender architecture photographed against river

Central ring bearing under mast. 14 of 15.

Central ring bearing under mast

Leaving the crossing bank side. 15 of 15.

Leaving the crossing bank side

GREENWICH REACH BRIDGE, Deptford, South East London, 2016, Moxon Architects
Architectural photography of Greenwich Reach bridge:

Moxon Architect’s Greenwich Reach Swing Bridge completes the riverside Thames Path, crossing the mouth of Deptford Creek in South East London. Planned as part of the Greenwich Reach development, the structure provides a crucial piece of public infrastructure within a sensitive part of Central London. The scheme consists of a 44m span cable stayed footbridge with a single mast and a central cable plane. A short 8m back-span contains a counterweight and provides an attachment point for pairs of backstay cables, which support the tip of the mast laterally and longitudinally. The structure is supported on a slewing ring bearing underneath the mast with electric motors to drive the bridge clear of the navigation channel.

Winner of the best Pedestrian Bridges at Structural Awards 2015 (All images copyright Simon Kennedy, London Architectural Photographer)
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